PRB is governed by a Board of Trustees representing diverse community and professional interests.

Elizabeth Schoenecker, Chair of the Board
Elizabeth Schoenecker is a former chief of the Policy, Evaluation, and Communication Division of the Office of Population and Reproductive Health at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). In that position, she led a team overseeing projects with combined annual expenditures of $85 million to $100 million. During her career at USAID, Schoenecker also served as a chief technical officer, designing and managing projects that provided worldwide assistance on policy formulation and analysis, data collection and analysis, advocacy and communication, and population-health-environment. She was also a Washington-based country coordinator for USAID’s Global Health Bureau, working closely with the USAID Missions in Philippines, Egypt, and Cambodia for 18 years. Prior to working at USAID, Schoenecker was an economist at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. She holds a master of science degree from Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Marquette University.

Amanda Glassman, Vice Chair of the Board 
Amanda Glassman is the director of global health policy and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, leading work on priority setting, resource allocation, and value for money in global health, with a particular interest in vaccination. She has 20 years of experience working on health and social protection policy and programs in Latin America and elsewhere in the developing world. Prior to her current position, Glassman was principal technical lead for health at the Inter-American Development Bank, where she led health economics and financing knowledge products and policy dialogue with member countries, designed the results-based grant program Salud Mesoamerica 2015, and served as team leader for conditional cash transfer programs such as Mexico’s Oportunidades and Colombia’s Familias en Accion. From 2005 to 2007, Glassman was deputy director of the Global Health Financing Initiative at the Brookings Institution and carried out policy research on aid effectiveness and domestic financing issues in the health sector in low-income countries. Glassman holds a master of science degree from the Harvard School of Public Health and a bachelor’s degree from Brown University. She has published on a wide range of health and social protection finance and policy topics and is editor and co-author of the books From Few to Many: A Decade of Health Insurance Expansion in Colombia (IDB and Brookings 2010) and The Health of Women in Latin America and the Caribbean (World Bank 2001).

Susan E. McGregor, Secretary of the Board
Susan E. McGregor is an academic journalist with expertise in digital media and digital security. She is currently an assistant professor of journalism at Columbia University and assistant director of the Tow Center of Digital Journalism. From 2007 to 2011, she was a senior programmer for online news graphics at the Wall Street Journal Online, where she won the Gerald Loeb Award for her work on WSJ's "What They Know" series. She has developed a mobile app (Dispatch) for secure source communication and a platform (DataDocs) for creating interactive web videos. She holds a master's degree in educational technology from New York University.

Jamie Herring, Treasurer of the Board 
Jamie Herring is the founder and president of HabitatSeven, a new media lab dedicated to broadening the impacts of science research and education. An experienced multimedia and video producer, Herring has worked on projects for a diverse range of partners including Cornell University, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NASA, the White House, the United Nations, the Royal Government of Bhutan, and the Cree Grand Council. Recently, he has been focusing on climate science and the digital distribution of climate information and data. For example, he was the executive producer for digital strategy for the National Climate Assessment launched by President Obama in May 2014, and launched www.ClimateData.us in support of the White House's Climate Action Plan. Among his current projects, Herring is the executive digital producer for an upcoming release of the Climate Resilience Toolkit's climate data explorer, producing climate mapping applications in collaboration with NASA's Ames Research Centre and NOAA's Climate Division. He holds a doctorate from Cornell University, where he studied Natural Resources, Information Sciences, and Development Sociology.

Jeffrey Jordan, President and CEO
Jeff Jordan is president and CEO of PRB. Please see the Leadership and Staff page for his full bio.

Christine A. Bachrach is a social demographer with scientific interests that have spanned the areas of fertility, family formation, marriage and divorce, adoption, sexual behavior, contraceptive practice, population health, and survey methodology. She is currently a research professor in the Department of Sociology and at the Maryland Population Research Center at the University of Maryland. She was the 2013 president of the Population Association of America and serves on the Committee on Population of the National Research Council. She was acting associate director for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research at the National Institutes of Health from 2008 to 2010; and chief of the Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development from 1992 to 2008. She holds a doctorate in population dynamics from Johns Hopkins University.

Alaka Basu is currently a Senior Fellow at the United Nations Foundation in Washington D.C., on leave from her position of professor of Development Sociology at Cornell University. She was the director of the South Asia Program at Cornell from 2002 to 2008. She has published extensively in academic and popular outlets in the areas of social demography, gender and development, and South Asian Studies. Basu has served on the committees on reproductive health and on population projections of the National Academy of Sciences, and on expert committees of several United Nations panels. She has also been a member of the governing councils of the Population Association of America, the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, and the Population Council in New York. She is currently on the editorial boards of the journals Population and Development Review, and Asian Population Studies.

Geoffrey D. Dabelko is professor and director of the Environmental Studies Program at the George V. Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. He teaches and conducts applied research on natural resources, conflict, and peacebuilding; global environmental politics; climate change and security; and environmental leadership. He currently focuses on the conflict and peacebuilding potential of climate change responses and co-directs an annual environmental peacebuilding study abroad program in the Balkans. From 1997 to 2012, he served as director of the Environmental Change and Security Program, a nonpartisan policy forum on environment, population, and security issues at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. He continues to work as a senior advisor to the Wilson Center where he collaborates with policymakers, practitioners, and scholars grappling with the complex connections that link environment, health, population, conflict, and security. Dabelko holds a doctorate in Government and Politics from the University of Maryland and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Duke University.

Bert T. Edwards is an accounting/financial consultant. He retired from his position as executive director of the U.S. Dept. of Interior, Office of Historical Accounting, in 2010 after nine years. Earlier, he served as assistant secretary/CFO of the U.S. State Department from 1998 to 2001 and as a consultant from 1994 to 1998; and for 33 years with Arthur Andersen LLP, retiring as a partner. He has been a CPA since 1963, and has served PRB in various capacities for over 30 years.

Parfait M. Eloundou-Enyegue is a professor in development sociology and demography at Cornell University and is the associate director of Cornell's Population Program. His research covers three related areas that include the sociology of education, social change, and the demography of inequality. He regularly collaborates with, and has served as consultant to, global development institutions working on issues of poverty reduction and inequality (World Bank, USAID, the United Nations). He is interested in global policy research, outreach, and communication. With support from the William & Flora Hewlett Foundation and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP), he is leading a six-year effort to advance demographic research and policy in Francophone Africa. He received his Ph.D. in demography and rural sociology from the Pennsylvania State University in 1997. He is a former Fellow of PRB's Policy Communication Program.

David Finn is executive director and associate general counsel of the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, where he leads a team of approximately 100 people located in more than 30 countries around the world. He oversees the company’s global enforcement and intelligence efforts against organized criminals and other illicit organizations engaged in all forms of cybercrime. He has collaborated extensively with prosecutors and law enforcement officials worldwide since joining Microsoft in 1999. Before working at Microsoft, Finn was an assistant United States attorney in New York City, where he worked closely with various U.S. federal and state law enforcement agencies and prosecuted an array of violent and economic crimes before juries and district court judges, arguing a dozen cases before the United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit. He has also worked as a research assistant for a Member of Parliament in London, a journalist for a New York Times Company-owned newspaper in Florida, a law clerk for a federal judge in New York, and an attorney for an international law firm in Washington, D.C. A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Finn is based at the Microsoft Cybercrime Center in Redmond, WA, and lives in Seattle with his wife and two children.

Robert M. Groves is a social statistician who studies how social, cognitive, and behavioral factors influence the quality of statistical information. He is currently provost at Georgetown University and also the Gerard Campbell Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the Department of Sociology. From 2009 to 2012, he was director of the U.S. Census Bureau; and from 2001 to 2009, he was director of the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan. His research has examined how data collection modes affect survey responses; social and political influences on survey participation; the use of adaptive research designs to reduce survey cost and error; and how public concerns about privacy affect attitudes toward statistical agencies. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, among numerous other honors. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

Scott McDonald is president of Nomos Research in New York City. He has taught courses in media measurement and economics at Columbia Business School since 1998, most recently the popular “Measuring and Monetizing Media Audiences.” The course examines the role of audience measurement in establishing the advertising value of television, magazine, radio, and web audiences; the increasing difficulty of making those measurements; and the efforts by media industry stakeholders to adapt to ongoing digital disruption. From 2001 to 2014, he was senior vice president for research at Condé Nast—publisher of such cross-platform media titles as Vogue, Vanity Fair, GQ, Wired, Architectural Digest, and The New Yorker. Scott came to media research from a background in applied demography and he has pioneered the application of such demographic methods as cohort analysis to the study of media audience trends. He has published frequently in such media industry publications as the Journal of Advertising Research, and he has contributed numerous peer-reviewed papers at such venues as the Advertising Research Foundation, Worldwide Readership Research Symposium, and the Print & Digital Research Forum. Scott holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley and a doctorate in sociology from Harvard University. He was a National Science Foundation Fellow (1978-1981) and a Charles Abrams Fellow at Harvard and M.I.T. (1981-1982).

Marta Tienda is the Maurice P. During ’22 professor of Demographic Studies and a professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton. She is the former director of Princeton’s Office of Population Research, a past president of the Population Association of America, and a former Guggenheim Fellow. Tienda has authored or co-authored more than 200 scientific papers and chapters covering U.S. racial and ethnic inequality, international migration, variations in family structure and reproductive behavior, and access to higher education. Currently, Tienda serves as an independent trustee of the Teachers Insurance Annuity Association, The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Jacobs Foundation of Switzerland. Tienda received a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Michigan State University, and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin.

Linda J. Waite is the Lucy Flower Professor in Urban Sociology at the University of Chicago. Her current research interests include social demography; aging; the family; health; working families; and the link between biology, psychology, and the social world. Waite is the director of the Center on Demography and Economics of Aging at NORC; a co-director of the MD/Ph.D. Program in Medicine, the Social Sciences, and Aging; and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for eHarmony Labs. In 2008, she became the recipient of a National Institutes of Health Method to Extend Research in Time (MERIT) award. The project for which Waite received the MERIT award involved work on biomarkers and pharmaceutical data on population-based aging research. Her work yielded groundbreaking knowledge about the sexual behavior of older Americans, and was part of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). Waite holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

Carolyn West manages PNC Bank's nonprofit portfolio in the greater Washington market. This portfolio consists of the some of the most significant and prestigious nonprofit organizations in Washington, including universities, cultural organizations, trade associations, think tanks, private schools, and other 501.c3 entities. Originally joining Riggs Bank in 1982, West has 30 years of banking experience in the Washington area with 20 of those years in the nonprofit area. In addition, she serves on the Community Involvement Committee for PNC in Washington. She received a bachelor's degree from Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina; and an MBA from the University of Texas at Austin. West also maintains Series 7 and 63 securities licenses and has served on the boards of several nonprofit organizations.