Summary

(August 2010) Businesses, governments, and individuals are trying to understand and plan for shifts in the demand for highly skilled workers, particularly those workers with advanced degrees and experience in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Global shifts in production, consumption, education, and training are affecting regional, national, and local economies and their labor markets. To understand and respond to shifts in the demand for and supply of skilled labor, it is critical to have access to authoritative and high-quality data about skilled workers—both those currently in the labor force and those in the education pipeline.

We hope that STEM Workers: Data Sources will provide useful information about where to find credible and accessible data on the skilled labor force in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We include information from government sources and international organizations. These guides are by no means a comprehensive list of all sources for data related to the skilled workforce in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Instead, we are sharing resources identified in our search for comparable indicators with which to assess the stock of skilled workers in each of the three countries relative to other countries, the flow of skilled workers into each of these countries from other countries, and the production of future workers. 

This project is underwritten through the generosity of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.


Marlene Lee is senior research associate, Domestic Programs, at the Population Reference Bureau. Nadwa Mossaad is research associate, Domestic Programs, at the Population Reference Bureau.