Summary

The Economic Impact of Adverse Maternal Health Outcomes

The maternal mortality ratio in Burkina Faso is 400 deaths per 100,000 live births, far higher than the global average of 126 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2013. Most maternal deaths are caused by severe obstetric complications that could have been prevented by adequate treatment and care, but user fees make health care unaffordable for many. Lack of care can have dire physical, social, and economic consequences for individuals and households. This fact sheet specifically explores the economic impacts of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes.

Access to Health Care Affects Teenage Childbearing

Evidence from South Africa indicates that physical distance to a health care facility is important for health care access and outcomes. Specifically, research on adolescent health in South Africa shows that the distance to a care facility influences sexual health and timing of teenage childbearing. This fact sheet also explores the adverse health and economic impacts of teenage childbearing.

Social and Economic Factors Influence Contraceptive Use

Family planning helps women prevent or delay childbearing and space pregnancies for healthier outcomes, but many women in Tanzania have an unmet need for contraception. A woman's partner, social network, knowledge of contraception, and economic situation may influence her use of contraception. This fact sheet explores those factors as well as actions that could reduce unmet need among women and empower them to have the families they want.

Economic Shifts Affect the Well-Being of Vulnerable Populations

A challenging global environment with slow economic growth, volatile commodity prices, higher food and energy prices, and extreme weather events and natural disasters contribute to poverty in Southern and Southeastern Asia. This fact sheet shares research on how economic shocks affect the health, education, and human capital of the world’s most vulnerable populations.


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