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Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth

Product: ENGAGE Multimedia Presentation

Author: Health Policy Plus

Date: October 20, 2020

In Malawi, strategic and multisectoral investments in youth are critical pieces of national growth and development. Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth is an ENGAGE™ multimedia presentation that describes the necessary investments in young people’s health, education, employment opportunities, and participation in governance that can create a window of opportunity for accelerated economic development.

The goal of Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth is to build awareness of the overlapping needs and priorities of multiple sectors and increase support for cross-sectoral investments in Malawi’s young people. To achieve this goal, the presentation is designed to boost individuals’ understanding of the links between and among young peoples’ health, education, employment, and meaningful participation in governance, and how investments in each of these sectors can contribute to Malawi’s growth and development.

Developed with the guidance of a multisectoral taskforce chaired by the Ministry of Health and with representatives of government and civil society, the presentation incorporates youth interview clips, up-to-date research and data, and specific policy recommendations. Target audiences include national and subnational government policymakers; health, education, employment, and youth sector leaders; program officials; journalists; and others.

Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth is a 19-minute presentation available as a narrated video and a click-through .exe file for live presentations. The presentation is accompanied by a presentation guide designed to help users make the most of the presentation. The guide includes supplemental materials such as the full presentation script, references, key messages with screenshots, FAQs, and a discussion guide that can be used to prompt interaction and dialogue among viewers.

Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth Video thumbnail

Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth

Growing Together: Multisectoral Investments in Malawi’s Youth

Presentation Guide

Download (PDF 4MB)

Live Presentation background material

Download . exe file (ZIP, 248 MB)

Malawi ENGAGE™ Media Clips: English

Education Video thumbnail

Education

Education

Employment Video thumbnail

Employment

Employment

Health Video thumbnail

Health

Health

Malawi ENGAGE™ : Chichewa

Kukulira Limodzi: Kufesa Mipamba Yangodya Zotukulira Achinyamata m'Malawi Video thumbnail

Kukulira Limodzi: Kufesa Mipamba Yangodya Zotukulira Achinyamata m'Malawi

Kukulira Limodzi: Kufesa Mipamba Yangodya Zotukulira Achinyamata m'Malawi

  • Ndondomeko Yoyenera Kutsata Pofotokozera Ndi Kuphunzitsa ( PDF, 4 MB)

Malawi ENGAGE™ Media Clips: Chichewa

Maphunziro Video thumbnail

Maphunziro

Maphunziro

Ntchito Video thumbnail

Ntchito

Ntchito

Zaumoyo Video thumbnail

Zaumoyo

Zaumoyo

HP+ is a five-year cooperative agreement funded by USAID under Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-15-00051, beginning Aug. 28, 2015. HP+ is implemented by Palladium, in collaboration with Avenir Health, Futures Group Global Outreach, Plan International USA, Population Reference Bureau, RTI International, ThinkWell, and the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood.

This presentation was produced for review by USAID. It was prepared by HP+. The information provided is not official U.S. Government information and does not necessarily reflect the views or positions of USAID or the U.S. Government.

ENGAGE is a trademark of Population Reference Bureau.


Photo credit: Kristungati CC BY-SA 4.0

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Malawi HP+ Youth Champions: In Their Own Words

Product: Video

Author: Health Policy Plus

Date: May 29, 2019

Malawi Youth Champions Video thumbnail

Malawi Youth Champions

Malawi Youth Champions

In 2018, HP+ conducted policy and advocacy training in Malawi to amplify the voices of young adults working on issues related to youth-friendly health services. The short video presents the voices of three youth champions (also featured in the HP+ 2019 World Population Day blog) who attended the training and are continuing to work in various ways to inspire and educate youth in their communities.

women working at a sewing machine

Enhancing Family Planning Equity for Inclusive Economic Growth and Development

Product: Policy Brief

Authors: Kaitlyn Patierno Imelda Feranil Meghan Reidy

Date: April 19, 2018

Across sub-Saharan Africa, national development strategies have established the goal of achieving economic growth that is both rapid and equitable across a population. Efforts to promote shared prosperity will be strengthened by demographic changes that facilitate greater investment in human capital. Households with fewer children can afford to make greater investments in child health and education and can build savings. Such benefits are often greatest among richer subgroups.

Differences in fertility decline produce imbalances in the age structure of a country’s richest and poorest wealth quintiles. Disparities in contraceptive use—a key driver of fertility decline—between the rich and poor are well-documented. These disparities can be the product of inequality (reflecting different fertility intentions) or inequity (reflecting different ability to achieve desired fertility). In most sub-Saharan African countries, both factors are involved.

This policy brief explores wealth-based disparities in the modern contraceptive prevalence rate, total fertility rate, and demand satisfied for modern methods of family planning in four United States Agency for International Development priority countries—Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, and Tanzania. It explores the impact of those disparities on the age structure of the richest and poorest wealth quintiles through 2050 and highlights lessons learned in achieving equitable fertility decline and recommendations for each country to accelerate progress. While the degree to which countries prioritize family planning varies, ensuring that the benefits of smaller families are available to households regardless of socioeconomic status can accelerate progress toward inclusive economic growth and shared prosperity. All countries striving for such growth should prioritize reducing wealth-based fertility disparities.

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Two New Policy Briefs Focus on Sustainable Development Goals in Pakistan and Malawi

Type: Policy Briefs

Author: Health Policy Plus

Date: August 23, 2017

Recent research suggests linking family planning to broader development goals may alleviate of rapid population growth and associated pressures upon natural and human resources.

Rising populations affect access to clean water, transport, and electricity; access to social services, such as education; environmental sustainability; and food security, among other things. Reducing unintended pregnancies through voluntary family planning is one clear way of easing such pressures.

The United Nations adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of 17 goals and 169 associated targets (to be met by 2030) that establish priorities for poverty eradication, health, education, and food security, and a host of related economic, social, and environmental objectives. An added commitment to family planning and reproductive health in the SDGs will require concerted efforts at the national and subnational level.

How can this be done in Malawi where more than half of the total population is under age 19, a situation that puts the country at risk for widespread youth unemployment, civil instability, and slower development? Or in Sindh province in Pakistan where the population is growing at 2 percent per year and whose capital city Karachi has the 12th largest urban population in the world? Two new policy briefs from the Health Policy Plus (HP+) Project focus attention on these questions. HP+ is a partnership between Palladium, Avenir Health, Futures Group Global Outreach, Plan International USA, Population Reference Bureau, RTI International, the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood, and ThinkWell.

The answer is with key stakeholders representing government, civil society, and the private sector, ensuring that objectives and priorities around the SDGs are locally relevant and realistic. Successful policy execution will require building the capacity of government departments that are implementing programs, by tracking progress towards policy targets, and holding policymakers accountable for promised commitments. A first step is aligning provincial-level development goals with the SDGs. And, a good place to start is with family planning.