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Webinaire. Dialogue politique entre Jeunes et Décideurs sur l’utilisation durable de la contraception chez les jeunes en Afrique de l’Ouest

Webinaire

Mercredi 26 mai 2021 – 14H00 à 16H00 GMT

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En collaboration avec le
Réseau des Femmes Sénégalaises pour la Promotion de la Planification Familiale (REFESPF) et le projet Knowledge SUCCESS, le Project PACE, mis en œuvre par PRB, vous invite à un dialogue politique virtuel entre des jeunes leaders et des décideurs politiques.

Ce dialogue est basé sur une note de politique élaborée par PACE, une analyse secondaire de résultats de recherches fournissant des recommandations politiques pour réduire les barrières à l’utilisation durable des contraceptifs par les jeunes.

Cette rencontre a pour objectif de renforcer l’engagement des décideurs régionaux à surmonter les obstacles à l’utilisation durable de la contraception chez les jeunes, et également de créer des liens et des opportunités de collaboration entre les organisations dirigées par des jeunes, les journalistes et les jeunes chercheurs.

 

Les présentations seront suivies d’une table ronde avec :

  • M Rachid Awal, AfriYAN Niger
  • Fatou Diop, Point focal Jeune du Partenariat de Ouagadougou et de FP2030 au Sénégal, Chargée de la recherche à l’ANJSR/PF
  • Honorable Assoupi Amèle Adjeh, Vice-Présidente de la Commission Santé de l’Assemblée Nationale du Togo
  • Angelo Evariste Ahouandjinou, Maire de la commune de Abomey-Calavi du Bénin
  • Dr Siré Camara, Cheffe de Division PF/DNSFN au Ministere de la santé de Guinée Conakry
  • Mme Fatimata Sanou Toure, Magistrat et Experte en genre et en Droit de la Santé Sexuelle et Reproductive du Burkina Faso

 

Modéré par :

Aïssata Fall, Conseillère Régionale Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre, PRB

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How Can We Holistically Address Equity, Conservation, Reproductive Health, and Livelihood Needs During the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Type: Webinar Series

Date: June 17, 2020

Funder: USAID

Nearly everyone has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic that is sweeping the globe, straining health systems and people’s abilities to maintain their livelihoods.

This global health crisis combines with the climate crisis to exacerbate existing inequalities that overwhelmingly affect vulnerable populations, such as women, youth, those living in poverty, and rural and indigenous communities.

On June 3, 2020, leaders in the fields of conservation, reproductive health, and gender equality convened to discuss the shared challenges and impacts arising from the COVID-19 pandemic and the common areas of opportunity they are witnessing to harness this moment for positive change.

How Can We Holistically Address Equity, Conservation, Reproductive Health, and Livelihood Needs? Video thumbnail

How Can We Holistically Address Equity, Conservation, Reproductive Health, and Livelihood Needs?

How Can We Holistically Address Equity, Conservation, Reproductive Health, and Livelihood Needs?

Panelists evoked the gravity as well as the opportunity of the challenges facing the development community in the face of COVID-19, in particular in sub-Saharan Africa. All panelists emphasized that COVID-19 has served to highlight existing development challenges, further highlighting the linkages between areas such as gender, livelihoods, human rights, and conservation, as well as the importance of multisectoral approaches to enhance resilience to such shocks. “COVID-19 has made it clear that humanity is dependent on nature, that interconnectedness of nature and life on earth infuses every part of our lives,” stated Kaddu Sebunya. Echoing a similar sentiment, Latanya Mapp Frett drew parallels between the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis in terms of their effect on existing and interrelated inequalities, stating, “we see an amazing amount of interconnectedness between climate and gender at every single level.”

While the direct public health impacts of the virus’s spread have been devastating, its secondary impacts on economic security, mobility, and safety affect the well-being of vulnerable communities. Jason Bremner presented data on household surveys from women in due to the pandemic, indicating: “It wasn’t as much about the lack of a method, but much more about lack of money to pay for a method or concern about safety,” preventing women from accessing essential reproductive health services during the pandemic. Similarly, Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka pointed to the economic impact on communities living near national parks dependent on tourism, who found their major source of income devastated during the crisis. “One thing that has come out of the pandemic is the need to not just see tourism as the only financial incentive to conserve wildlife, because tourism comes and goes … there is a big need to find other livelihoods, and also to value conservation in other ways,” she states.

While the impacts of COVID-19 are severe and far-reaching, the panelists also highlighted the fact that the global pandemic presents an opportunity – and a call for action.

This webinar is part of the Africa Population, Environment, Development (PED) webinar series made possible through the USAID-funded PACE (Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health) project. For regular updates about PED news, opportunities, resources, and other events, subscribe to the monthly Global PED updates newsletter online and follow @AfricaPHE on Twitter.

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HoPE-LVB Project Evaluation Webinar

Type: Webinar

Authors: Population Reference Bureau

Date: May 23, 2019

Funder: USAID

Pathfinder International and partners in Kenya and Uganda have implemented the Health of the People and Environment in the Lake Victoria Basin (HoPE-LVB) project since 2011.

The project aims to scale up its use of the population, health, and environment (PHE) community-development model at local, national, and regional levels by integrating PHE considerations in formal government development planning and policies. “PHE” refers to the PHE approach, which aspires to increase access to comprehensive reproductive health services and improve maternal and child health care practices while simultaneously improving natural resource management in project communities.

 

HoPE LVB Project Evaluation Webinar 2019 04 30 09 02 Video thumbnail

HoPE LVB Project Evaluation Webinar 2019 04 30 09 02

HoPE LVB Project Evaluation Webinar 2019 04 30 09 02

On April 30th, 2019, HoPE-LVB project implementers and evaluators discussed the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) evaluation report on the model’s effectiveness and scalability. Released in April 2018, the USAID report addresses three key questions:

What are stakeholders’ perceptions of the HoPE-LVB project model’s added value to family planning and reproductive health, maternal and child health, livelihoods, governance, natural resources management, or conservation?
Has the HoPE-LVB project’s explicit focus on systematic planning for scale-up resulted in positive outcomes for the model’s institutionalization, sustainability, and expansion?
To what extent did the HoPE-LVB project achieve its objectives as measured by its key performance indicators/results?

The evaluation of HoPE-LVB had been long anticipated, as the project was supported by cross-sectoral investments by multiple donors and represents a pioneering East African PHE project implemented at scale.

The webinar, scheduled at 9:00 a.m. EST on April 30, 2019, was hosted by the PACE (Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health) project. It included the following speakers:

Clive Mutunga of USAID provided introductory remarks on USAID’s support for PHE models globally and what USAID learned from the evaluation of HoPE-LVB.
Eileen Mokaya of Pathfinder International provided an overview of the HoPE-LVB project.
Richard Kibombo of Global Health Program Cycle Improvement Project (GH Pro) shared the evaluation’s results and his suggested next steps for PHE sustainability and scale-up.

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Webinar: How Can Population, Health, and Environment Projects Learn From Family Planning High Impact Practices?

Product: Video

Author: Population Reference Bureau

Date: January 11, 2019

How Can Population, Health, and Environment Projects Learn From Family Planning High Impact Practice Video thumbnail

How Can Population, Health, and Environment Projects Learn From Family Planning High Impact Practice

How Can Population, Health, and Environment Projects Learn From Family Planning High Impact Practice

Family Planning High Impact Practices (HIPs) are a set of evidence-based practices developed by experts in the family planning sector that improve family planning and reproductive health outcomes. This webinar, hosted by the PACE (Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health) project and the Implementing Best Practices Initiative Secretariat, explores how HIPs can be applied in development programs that integrate multiple sectors at the community level, including family planning.

The newly published web feature and policy brief, provides background on HIPs and explores the promising opportunity to expand their use within population, health, and environment (PHE) projects. Speakers Laura Cooper Hall (Population Reference Bureau), Caitlin Thistle (United States Agency for International Development), and Yvette Ribaira (JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.) discuss the value of HIPs to PHE projects and family planning outcomes and highlight how PHE projects are already implementing HIPs elements in their activities.

The webinar concludes with a Q&A session between Caitlin Thistle, a HIP expert, and Yvette Ribaira, a PHE project implementer.

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Webinar: Questionable? Why an Untested Citizenship Question Threatens the 2020 Census

With the 2020 Census set to begin in less than 18 months, the Trump administration has proposed adding an untested question on citizenship status to the decennial survey. This action is currently being challenged in federal court by several states, and a decision is pending. Civil rights and scientific organizations alike are concerned that including the citizenship question will adversely affect participation in the 2020 Census and, ultimately, the quality of decennial census data.

In this webinar, population scientists Dr. Douglas S. Massey (Princeton University) and Dr. Jennifer Van Hook (Pennsylvania State University) discussed the implications of a citizenship question on the 2020 Census. Dr. Linda Jacobsen (Population Reference Bureau) moderated the discussion.

Webinar 2020 Census Citizenship Question Video thumbnail

Webinar 2020 Census Citizenship Question

 

View Massey slides

 

View Massey slides


The Population Association of America organized this webinar with support from PRB.

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Event: Addressing Gender-Based Violence Through Cash Transfer Programming, Part II

IGWG Addressing GBV Through Cash Transfer Programming Part II Video thumbnail

IGWG Addressing GBV Through Cash Transfer Programming Part II

December 3, 2018
8:30 AM – 11:30 AM

More money, less violence? This event was the second part in the IGWG’s Gender-Based Violence (GBV) Task Force series on the use of cash transfer approaches to address GBV and other reproductive health outcomes.

Part II of this series delved more deeply into the specifics of cash transfers for addressing GBV. What are the strengths and shortcomings for this type of intervention to reduce GBV? How have cash transfers been incorporated into GBV programs in humanitarian settings? What are the considerations for applying cash transfer interventions to reduce GBV when working with adolescent girls?

Panelists and Presentations


This event built on Part I, held on September 17. That event introduced cash transfer approaches, highlighted some of the evidence around the effectiveness of cash transfers for addressing GBV, and sparked a discussion of the pathways through which cash transfer programming can affect violence-related outcomes.

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Event: The Role of Population and Family Planning in Peace and Security

PRB’s PACE Project is co-sponsored a policy dialogue at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for scholars moderated by PRB Board of Trustees member, Geoffrey Dabelko. discussing how population dynamics and family planning impact peace and security.

“A More Secure World: The Role of Population and Family Planning in Peace and Security.”

A More Secure World: The Role of Population and Family Planning in Peace and Security Video thumbnail

A More Secure World: The Role of Population and Family Planning in Peace and Security

A More Secure World: The Role of Population and Family Planning in Peace and Security

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Webinar: The Gender Action Plan (GAP) From a Reproductive Health Perspective

On May 3, 2018, the People, Health, Planet team hosted a webinar titled “The Gender Action Plan (GAP) from a Reproductive Health Perspective.” Facilitated by PRB policy analyst, Laura Cooper Hall, the webinar included guest speakers from the Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO), Sex & Samfund – The Danish Family Planning Association (DFPA), and the PHE Ethiopia Consortium (Population Health Environment).

Webinar: The Gender Action Plan (GAP) From a Reproductive Health Perspective Video thumbnail

Webinar: The Gender Action Plan (GAP) From a Reproductive Health Perspective

Webinar: The Gender Action Plan (GAP) From a Reproductive Health Perspective

Cooper Hall provided background on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), its Conference of Parties (COPs), and how health―particularly reproductive health―has been included in the COPs. She also introduced the first ever Gender Action Plan (GAP) to the UNFCCC. Bridget Burns, codirector of WEDO, discussed health and gender in the UNFCCC, highlighting the value of diverse health actors and advocates and challenges for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocates. Burns also identified entry points for SRHR in the climate policy arena, including the GAP.

Ida Klockmann, advocacy officer at DFPA and coordinator of the Population and Sustainable Development Alliance (PSDA), outlined the links between SRHR, family planning, and climate adaptation, and introduced the status of SRHR in climate change policies at the United Nations (UN) level. She explained how the DFPA and PSDA partners advocate for SRHR to be integrated in climate change policies through recognition of it as a goal and a means to improve resilience and enable climate adaptation at the UN policy level. Klockmann identified how SRHR and family planning could be included in the GAP, according to four of its five priority areas.

Finally, Negash Teklu, executive director of the PHE Ethiopia Consortium, shared his experiences representing the PHE community before policy actors at the UNFCCC and its COPs since 2009. Teklu detailed the various ways he has advocated for the integration of SRHR and gender into climate change responses, including as a government delegate and member of different advocacy networks.

These three speakers provided diverse approaches on how SRHR has been and can be included in the UNFCCC. They highlighted the need for SRHR’s continued inclusion in climate adaptation policies while recognizing the valuable advocacy opportunities and entry points already available to SRHR advocates.

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new-00-PHE-Webinar-Madagascar

Webinaire SPE en Afrique : Actualités sur le Réseau SPE à Madagascar à l'attention de la communauté francophone

Le 28 février, le projet PACE—Renforcement des politiques, du plaidoyer et de la communication pour la santé de la population et la procréation—a organisé un webinaire en français sur la Santé, la Population et l’Environnement en Afrique intitulé « Actualités sur le projet SPE en Afrique à l’attention de la communauté francophone ». Ont participé au webinaire des conférenciers invités du Réseau SPE à Madagascar, John Snow, Inc. (JSI), et la Société pour la conservation de la vie sauvage (WCS – Wildlife Conservation Society). Le webinaire était animé par Marissa Falk, une analyste politique du PRB.

Yvette Ribaira, de JSI, a présenté l’histoire du Réseau SPE à Madagascar et a identifié des opportunités spécifiques permettant d’assurer la durabilité et la viabilité du réseau. Elle a souligné l’importance de l’engagement dans le contexte politique national, ainsi que dans les programmes des organisations non gouvernementales et la nécessité de formaliser et de renforcer les services et les structures communautaires. Nantenaina Andriamalala, coordinateur du réseau SPE à Madagascar, a fourni des détails supplémentaires sur le réseau lui-même, soulignant la croissance et la portée du réseau dans l’ensemble du pays et son approche stratégique. Il a ensuite affirmé les opportunités soulignées par Ribaira, expliquant plus en détail la façon de créer un environnement institutionnel qui soutiendra et favorisera l’adoption de l’approche SPE à Madagascar.

Enfin, Tiana Raharitsimba, de la WCS, a partagé l’expérience de WCS dans le cadre du réseau SPE à Madagascar, en partageant les mises à jour de ses travaux et en décrivant les avantages pour une organisation de conservation au sein du réseau. Ces avantages comprennent la capacité de s’engager avec la communauté, la confiance dans les partenaires et les partenariats, et une méthode et un intérêt communs pour assurer des mesures de sauvegarde sociales et environnementales, qui renforcent la force des partenaires et du réseau lui-même.

Mises à jour des projets SPE en Afrique en direction de la communauté francophone  Video thumbnail

Mises à jour des projets SPE en Afrique en direction de la communauté francophone

Mises à jour des projets SPE en Afrique en direction de la communauté francophone

La communauté de pratique du réseau SPE en Afrique est composée de différents projets issus d’un large éventail d’exécutants dans plusieurs pays africains. L’augmentation des possibilités d’apprentissage et la promotion de l’échange d’idées sont essentielles pour renforcer les réseaux locaux et nationaux. En partageant leurs connaissances et leurs expériences, les trois conférenciers ont montré comment une certaine communauté de pratique s’est renforcée et développée au fil du temps, offrant de précieuses opportunités d’apprentissage pour la communauté de pratique SPE en Afrique en général.

Le webinaire a été organisé dans le cadre du projet Renforcement des politiques, du plaidoyer et de la communication pour la santé de la population et la procréation (PACE).

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new-00-PHE-Webinar-Madagascar

Africa PHE Webinar: Updates from the Madagascar PHE Network for the Francophone Community

On February 28 the PACE—Policy, Advocacy, and Communication Enhanced for Population and Reproductive Health—Project hosted an Africa population, health, and environment (PHE) webinar in French, titled “Africa PHE Project Updates for the Francophone Community.” The webinar included guest speakers from the Madagascar PHE Network, John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). It was facilitated by Marissa Falk, a policy analyst at PRB.

Yvette Ribaira, of JSI, shared the history of the Madagascar PHE Network and identified specific opportunities for the network’s durability and sustainability. She highlighted the value of engaging within the national political context as well as with nongovernmental organization programs, and the importance of formalizing and strengthening community services and structures. Nantenaina Andriamalala, Madagascar PHE Network coordinator, provided further details on the network itself, highlighting the network’s growth and scope throughout the country and its strategic approach. He went on to affirm Ribaira’s highlighted opportunities, providing further details on how to create an institutional environment that will support and foster the adoption of the PHE Madagascar approach.

Mises à jour des projets SPE en Afrique en direction de la communauté francophone  Video thumbnail

Mises à jour des projets SPE en Afrique en direction de la communauté francophone

Mises à jour des projets SPE en Afrique en direction de la communauté francophone

Finally, Tiana Raharitsimba, of WCS, shared the experience of WCS as part of the Madagascar PHE Network, sharing updates from their work and outlining the advantages for a conservation organization within the network. These advantages include the ability to engage with the community, confidence in partners and partnerships, and a common interest and method in ensuring social and environmental safeguards, all of which reinforce the strength of partners and the network itself.

The Africa PHE community of practice is composed of diverse projects from a wide array of implementers in multiple African countries. Increasing learning opportunities and fostering the exchange of ideas is critical to strengthening local and national networks. By sharing their knowledge and experiences, the three speakers showed how a certain community of practice has strengthened and grown over time, providing valuable learning opportunities for the Africa PHE community of practice as a whole.

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