Woman with braids looks into a blue gray sky

Unsafe Abortion—A Crisis for the DRC and the Province of South Kivu

Product: ENGAGE Multimedia Presentation

Author: Population Reference Bureau

Date: October 20, 2020

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Avortements à risque

Avortements à risque

As one of the countries with the highest maternal mortality rates in the world, at 846 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is aiming to reduce deaths due to preventable causes, such as unsafe abortion.

The DRC is at a key turning point for expanding access to women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights. In March 2018, the Maputo Protocol was published in the country’s official journal, effectively legalizing access to safe abortion in the country. However, since that time, progress on implementation of the Maputo Protocol has taken time as guidelines for care are developed and rolled out across the country, a process which has been slowed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Meanwhile, COVID-19 has also increased the urgency for expanded access to care, as women are more vulnerable to violence or unwanted pregnancy. In eastern DRC in particular, where decades of conflict and humanitarian crises have contributed to high rates of sexual and gender-based violence, the health system is weak and women continue to seek unsafe abortion, placing their lives at risk.

In South Kivu, in eastern DRC, local actors are engaging in advocacy with the provincial government to respond to this urgent situation and capitalize on the progress that has been made towards expanding women’s rights to safe abortion in DRC. Through a provincial edict that would harmonize guidance around abortion care, allocation of resources to support medication abortion, and reinforcement of the weakened supply chain, South Kivu can respond to the urgent needs of women and girls and save lives.

 

En Français

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Préserver la santé et bâtir l’avenir du Burkina Faso : rendre accessible l’avortement sécurisé

Produit: ENGAGE Multimedia Presentation

Rédigé par: Population Reference Bureau

Date: 14 septembre 2020

Préserver la santé et bâtir l’avenir du Burkina Faso

Préserver la santé et bâtir l’avenir du Burkina Faso Video thumbnail

Préserver la santé et bâtir l’avenir du Burkina Faso

Préserver la santé et bâtir l’avenir du Burkina Faso

Au Burkina Faso, une grossesse sur dix se termine par un avortement provoqué. La grande majorité de ces interruptions de grossesse sont pratiquées de manière clandestine et non sécurisée, c’est-à-dire à l’aide d’une méthode inappropriée ou par un prestataire non formé, ou les deux à la fois. Les avortements non sécurisés sont dangereux pour la santé en général et constituent une menace vitale pour la vie des femmes de façon spécifique. Elles épuisent également les ressources financières du système de santé et contribuent à la mortalité maternelle.

Bien que l’avortement soit juridiquement limité au Burkina Faso, il est autorisé par la loi dans certains cas. Mais de nombreux obstacles empêchent les femmes d’accéder à ce service, surtout en milieu rural. En élargissant l’accès à l’avortement sécurisé dans le cadre de la loi, le Burkina Faso pourrait diminuer la mortalité maternelle du fait des avortements clandestins, réduire les dépenses liées à la prise en charge des complications des interruptions de grossesse non sécurisées et lever les obstacles au développement pour les femmes et les jeunes filles.

« Préserver la santé et bâtir l’avenir du Burkina Faso : rendre accessible l’avortement sécurisé » est un outil de plaidoyer multimédia élaboré conjointement par le groupe de travail de SAFE ENGAGE Burkina Faso pour sensibiliser le grand public, les leaders communautaires et les acteurs du développement aux causes et aux conséquences des avortements non sécurisés au Burkina Faso. Il s’agit de contribuer à élargir l’accès au paquet de services de soins d’avortement sécurisé dans le cadre de la loi.

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La planification familiale réduit les l’avortements non sécurisés (Instantané)

La planification familiale réduit les l’avortements non sécurisés (Instantané)

 

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Le contexte juridique (Instantané)

Le contexte juridique (Instantané)

 

Les conséquences de l’avortement non sécurisés (Instantané) Video thumbnail

Les conséquences de l’avortement non sécurisés (Instantané)

Les conséquences de l’avortement non sécurisés (Instantané)

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When a Parent Is Incarcerated, Partners and Children Also Pay a Price

“We live in a country where we have huge numbers of children exposed to parental incarceration. When we talk about the need to reform the criminal justice and mass incarceration systems, we also need to talk about the unintended victims of the current system,” says Christine Leibbrand of the University of Washington. “Incarceration exposes families to poverty and disadvantage, and the system can self-perpetuate inequality.”

About 3.5% of U.S. children under age 18—or one child in every classroom of about 29 students—had a parent behind bars in 2015, mainly their fathers.1

Black children were more than five times more likely than white children to be separated from a parent by incarceration, report sociologists Bryan Sykes of University of California, Irvine and Becky Pettit of University of Texas at Austin. These patterns reflect a system that disproportionately imprisons disadvantaged and minority men, they argue.

A growing body of research documents the toll U.S. incarceration takes on the families of those imprisoned, widening disparities and exacerbating existing disadvantages. New research supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development provides further evidence on the wide-ranging ways a parent’s incarceration shapes the lives and life chances of their partners and children, from the neighborhoods where they live to the levels of adversity their children experience.

Children of Incarcerated Fathers Are More Likely to Live in High-Poverty Neighborhoods and Move More Often

Children whose fathers were incarcerated move more frequently and live in neighborhoods that are more socioeconomically disadvantaged than their peers whose fathers have never been in prison, find Leibbrand and Erin Carll of the University of Washington, Angela Bruns of the University of Michigan now at Gonzaga University, and Hedwig Lee of Washington University in St. Louis.2

Using data from the national Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study—research following thousands of families in 20 large U.S. cities since 1998—the team examined the neighborhoods of children whose fathers were in prison or recently released. Families with a father currently or recently in prison tend to live in neighborhoods with higher percentages of residents who are single mothers, receive public assistance, lack a high school diploma, and live below the poverty line, they show.

The financial hardship families with imprisoned members face, researchers say, perpetuates what they call “downward mobility.” A father in prison is one less wage earner at home or paying child support. Families with limited income have fewer choices of where to live, they may move often, and the neighborhoods they end up in may be marked by lower quality schools, greater unemployment, and higher rates of crime and violence, Leibbrand and her colleagues report.

“When we think about where people live or move to, we think of people weighing the pros and cons of different places. That’s far too simple. Many families may be forced to move because of eviction or budget constraints, for example, and these forced moves are often to worse neighborhoods where families have little choice of where they would like to live,” says Leibbrand.

Mothers With a Partner in Prison Are More Likely to Hold Multiple Jobs

Mothers with incarcerated partners are more likely to work multiple jobs than women in otherwise similar circumstances, finds Bruns in another study.3

Partner incarceration is linked to additional employment—a third shift—on top of the paid work and caregiving women already do, she finds, based on analysis of Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study data.

An additional job may cover basic expenses but also compounds the burden that women with incarcerated partners already shoulder, she points out.

“Staying in touch and supporting an inmate—responding to his requests for food, clothing and books, preparing packages to the correctional institution’s specifications, coordinating family member visits, and keeping up with legal cases and appeals—can feel like a second job in and of itself,” explains Bruns.

Mothers with partners who are incarcerated usually have sole responsibility for children who may be “struggling with the absence of their fathers,” according to Bruns. Holding multiple jobs is also a known stressor that could raise mothers’ risk of stress-related health conditions.

Low-skilled women are often stuck in low-wage, dead-end jobs that can barely pay the bills, she asserts.

“Balancing multiple work roles in addition to family member incarceration may keep women from going to school or participating in other activities that improve their socioeconomic standing over the long-term,” writes Bruns.

Youth With a Parent in Prison Face More Trauma and Adversity

Youth ages 11 to 17 who experience the incarceration of a parent are more likely to have behavioral problems or mental health issues than their counterparts whose parents have never been jailed, Samantha J. Boch, Barbara L. Warren, and Jodi L. Ford of Ohio State University show.4

The team finds that household poverty plays a role, as does the number of traumatic events the young person has experienced, including homelessness, eviction, foster care, and serious injury or death in the family. Overall, they find that youth who deal with the incarceration of a parent experience three times as many adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) as their unaffected peers.

The researchers base their analysis on interviews with more than 600 parents or other caregivers participating in the Adolescent Development in Context study, a representative sample of Columbus, Ohio, and its surrounding suburbs.

The behavioral problems and mental health issues exhibited more frequently in children who experience a parent’s incarceration include poor attention, excessive anxiety, and externalizing behaviors such as rule breaking, temper outbursts, and property destruction, the analysis finds.

The researchers examined a wide-ranging set of 30 ACEs that includes aspects of financial distress and household churning or instability such as changes in household composition (for example, when a parent or parent’s new partner leaves or joins the household or when a child goes to live with grandparents) and residential moves.

“Well-documented research investigating the cumulative effect of ACEs indicates that youth exposed to parental incarceration may have a much greater likelihood for engaging in maladaptive coping behaviors (such as cigarette, alcohol, and illicit drug use, or violent delinquent behaviors) and experiencing depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder across the lifespan,” the researchers report.

They argue that mental health providers should view a parent’s incarceration as an important consideration of the child’s and family’s well-being that warrants continued observation, support, and follow-up. More research is needed to determine the best ways to screen and identify these youths using non-stigmatizing approaches that build on their strengths, they suggest. 

A Parent’s Incarceration Can Shape a Child’s Identity and Influence Anti-Social Behavior

Among young adults with an incarcerated parent, those who had a high need for parental approval were more likely to identify themselves as a troublemaker or partier during young adulthood than those who were emotionally independent, a recent study finds.5

Self-identities influence behavior, including criminal activity, making understanding the precursors of self-identity important to interventions designed to improve the life prospects of children with incarcerated parents, according to the researchers Jessica G. Finkeldey of the State University of New York at Fredonia, and Monica A. Longmore, Peggy C. Giordano, and Wendy D. Manning of Bowling Green State University.

The team examined publicly available incarceration records and analyzed data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study, a regional survey of more than 900 men and women ages 18 to 28 interviewed five times between 2001 and 2011.

Developing “high emotional independence, or values, beliefs, and identities in contrast to and separate from an incarcerated parent,” may set young adults on a path shaped by different choices than those made by their incarcerated parent, the researchers suggest.

“It is possible that exposing children of incarcerated parents to positive role models and mentors, such as through mentorship programs, might help to reduce the transmission of antisocial identities and behaviors and should be investigated,” says Finkeldey.


This article was produced under a grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The work of researchers from the following NICHD-funded population dynamics research centers was highlighted in this article: University of Washington, University of Michigan, Ohio State University, Bowling Green State University, and University of Texas at Austin.


 

References

  1. Bryan L. Sykes and Becky Pettit, “Measuring the Exposure of Parents and Children to Incarceration,” in Handbook on Children with Incarcerated Parents, ed. J. Mark Eddy and J. Poehlmann-Tynan, (Geneva: Springer, 2019): 11-23.
  2. Christine Leibbrand et al. “Barring Progress: The Influence of Parental Incarceration on Families’ Neighborhood Attainment,” Social Science Research 84 (2019): 102321
  3. Angela Bruns, “The Third Shift: Multiple Job Holding and the Incarceration of Women’s Partners,” Social Science Research 80 (2019): 202-15.
  4. Samantha J. Boch, Barbara L. Warren, and Jodi L. Ford, “Attention, Externalizing, and Internalizing Problems of Youth Exposed to Parental Incarceration,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing 40, no. 6 (2019): 466-75.
  5. Jessica G. Finkeldey et al. “Identifying as a Troublemaker/Partier: The Influence of Parental Incarceration and Emotional Independence,” Journal of Child and Family Studies 29, no. 3 (2020): 802-16.
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Enhancing Youth Advocacy Through Multimedia Campaigns

Enhancing Youth Advocacy Through Multimedia Campaigns

PRB inspired – Let Your Voice Be Heard Video thumbnail

PRB inspired – Let Your Voice Be Heard

This PIA MIMI created video on contraceptives was inspired by the Population Reference Bureau. The initiative began as an idea for meaningful youth participation given that young people’s voices are always sedated whenever it comes to highlighting their thoughts and beliefs. In this video PIA MIMI sought to deconstruct the sedation of young people’s voices and let young people speak their mind and literally take control of your future.

This PIA MIMI created video on contraceptives was inspired by the Population Reference Bureau. The initiative began as an idea for meaningful youth participation given that young people’s voices are always sedated whenever it comes to highlighting their thoughts and beliefs. In this video PIA MIMI sought to deconstruct the sedation of young people’s voices and let young people speak their mind and literally take control of your future.

PACE’s Youth Multimedia Campaigns training program equips youth advocates with the skills to create innovative digital campaigns, tell compelling population health stories, and build movements for policy change within their countries.

PACE’s Youth Multimedia Campaigns training program equips youth advocates with the skills to create innovative digital campaigns, tell compelling population health stories, and build movements for policy change within their countries. Using data-driven multimedia and events, youth participants collaborate with their peers to share powerful advocacy messages focused on the health and well-being of their communities. The PACE training program supports the institutional growth of youth-led organizations as well as a burgeoning network of youth leaders passionate about population dynamics and reproductive health.

PACE has partnered with competitively selected youth-led teams in Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, South Sudan, and Uganda to amplify their policy advocacy on topics such as youth-friendly family planning services, female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), child marriage, gender-based violence (GBV), fistula prevention, and maternal health.

Participating youth and their organizations receive tailored technical and leadership training and ongoing mentorship around techniques in policy communication, fact-based and data-driven advocacy, and multimedia production (text, graphics, images, video, and audio). Using accessible technology, including mobile phones and social media platforms, PACE-trained advocates build engaging campaigns focused on specific policy advocacy objectives, targeted at their peers, communities, and key decisionmakers. As part of the program, youth advocates are also expected to provide technical assistance and training to other youth in their communities, passing down their skills, expanding the reach of their campaigns, and sustaining local youth-led policy advocacy.

PARTNER SPOTLIGHT: Bridge Connect Africa Initiative

Two Nigerian activists, Sani Muhammad and Mubarak Idris, participated in the inaugural year of PACE’s Youth Multimedia Campaigns training program in 2018 and quickly established themselves as outstanding and committed population and reproductive health youth champions. With support from PACE, Muhammad and Idris successfully launched their youth-led organization, Bridge Connect Africa Initiative (BCAI), and partnered with PACE to lead the 2019 training program for two new youth teams in the Kano and Kaduna States of northern Nigeria.

The two campaigns, focused on ending child marriage and increasing access to youth-friendly family planning services, each generated positive policy change. After seeing the PACE-sponsored video and social media campaign generate broad support, the governor of Kano State made a public declaration to end child marriage through support of the Child Protection Bill. While the legislation is still pending, sections of the bill that provide for compulsory schooling for all children as a way of tackling child marriage have been adopted into a state-level policy. In Kaduna State, the governor’s chief of staff committed to sharing a video message to call on the state government to promote availability and access of family planning services for women and young people.

Alumni Showcase

Multimedia campaigns produced by alumni from each cohort of the Youth Multimedia Campaigns training program are highlighted here.

2020 Campaigns: Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, and South Sudan

2019 Campaigns: Kano and Kaduna States, Nigeria

2018 Campaigns: Kenya, Nigeria, and Uganda

The Pakistan project team is funded separately by PRB.

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Accessibility of Family Planning Services in Kaduna State: A Story from Rigasa Community

Young people are often judged and misunderstood for seeking information and services relating to their sexual and reproductive health. Working with a team of young people in Kaduna state with support from the Population Reference Bureau, young people are standing up to bring their issues to the fore of government priorities in accessing family planning information and services.

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Child Marriage in Kano Nigeria: A Call for the Domestication of the Child Protection Bill (2018)

Child marriage is one of the biggest problems in northern Nigeria, leading many young girls to drop out of school, and contributing to the high rates of maternal and infant deaths. Working with the Population Reference Bureau, we trained a team of young sexual and reproductive health advocates who used their smartphone to amplify voices of these girls.

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End Child Marriage

End Child Marriage

Meet Zainab! A mother of two who was married out as a child bride. Like Zainab, over 6 million girls in Nigeria are forced into marriage at age 15, and live with dire consequences. Hear and Share her story. #SpeakUp. Let’s join the conversation to end child marriage.

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Supporting Coronavirus Outreach in Sub-Saharan Africa

Product: Videos

Author: Population Reference Bureau

Date: April 13, 2020

Partner: Cadres des Religieux pour la Santé et le Développement (CRSD)

All Together Against COVID 19 (Tous ensemble contre la COVID 19)

All Together Against COVID 19 (Tous ensemble contre la COVID 19) Video thumbnail

All Together Against COVID 19 (Tous ensemble contre la COVID 19)

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Tous ensemble contre la COVID 19 (Wolof)

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, PRB is supporting partners and others by providing information and resources to help communities stay safe. These videos, produced for our partner, Cadres des Religieux pour la Santé et le Développement (CRSD), encourage faith communities in the Sahel region of Africa to worship at home and to adopt other practices to stem the spread of the virus in that region.

Back view of grandfather standing hand in hand on the beach with his grandchildren watching the sea

Older Americans’ Greater Health Problems May Make Them More Vulnerable to Coronavirus’s Effects

United States Ranks 53 Out of 195 Countries on Aging-Health Problems

The United States doesn’t have the world’s oldest population, but relatively high levels of age-related disease could affect the proportion of Americans who become critically ill because of COVID-19.

Older Americans on average have a higher level of age-related health problems than their counterparts in Europe and many other countries (see table). That’s according to a recent Lancet study that shows the United States ranked 53rd out of 195 countries when it comes to how burdened its people are by old age-related disease and disability.

By comparison, Switzerland ranked 1st, South Korea ranked 3rd, Italy ranked 5th, and China ranked 75th. To compare the relative health of adults among countries, the study adjusted for the wide differences in the proportion of adults in each age group in each country. For example, Italians ages 65 and older make up 23% of the population compared with 16% in the United States, 15% in South Korea, and 12% in China.

Table. Countries Ranked Lowest to Highest by Age-Related Disease Burden, 2017

wdt_ID Rank Country
1 1 Switzerland
2 2 Singapore
3 3 South Korea
4 4 Japan
5 5 Italy
6 6 Kuwait
7 7 Spain
8 8 France
9 9 Israel
10 10 Sweden

Note: The age-related disease burden rate is based on the level of disability adjusted life years (DALYS; healthy years lost) per 1,000 adults ages 25 and older.
Source: Supplementary appendix to Angela Y. Chang et al., “Measuring Population Ageing: An Analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017,” Lancet Public Health 4, no. 3 (2019).

Why does it matter if older Americans have a relatively high disease burden? As the United States confronts coronavirus, the older population’s level of age-related disease and disability may affect the proportion of older adults who becomes critically ill. Individuals with underlying health conditions are more likely to have severe reactions to the COVID-19 infection, according to the CDC.

Cardiovascular diseases and cancers make up half of the age-related disease burden worldwide, according to Angela Y. Chang, assistant professor at the Danish Institute for Advance Study, who led the research team as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington. Diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a respiratory disease) are also leading sources of disease and premature death, driving differences among countries.

“Italy’s adults have a relatively lower burden of diseases that we think are related to aging than people in other countries,” she said (see figure). Italy’s population, however, has a larger share of older adults than most other countries, which increases the overall level of age-related diseases, she noted.

Figure. Cardiovascular Diseases, Chronic Respiratory Disease, and Diabetes/Chronic Kidney Disease Burden Rate Per 100,000 People Ages 55 to 69 in Italy, South Korea, and United States, 2017

Note: Disease burden rate is based on the level of disability-adjusted life years (DALYS; healthy years lost) per 100,000 adults. CKD is an acronym for chronic kidney disease.
Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Global Burden of Disease Study 2017.

Supported by the U.S. National Institute on Aging, the study examined the level of age-related burden resulting from 92 diseases and conditions. Researchers used a measure that quantifies premature death and years of life lived in less than full health (disability-adjusted life years, known as DALYS) to calculate the age-related disease burden for each country.

This study is the first of its kind to explore both chronological age and the pace at which aging contributes to health deterioration, using estimates from the 2017 Global Burden of Disease study.

It identified wide variation in how well or poorly people age, showing that a 30-year gap separates countries with the highest and lowest ages at which people experience the health problems of an average 65-year-old worldwide.

Chang and colleagues report that 76-year-olds in Japan and 46-year-olds in Papua New Guinea have the same level of age-related health problems as an average 65-year-old. Americans at age 69, United Kingdom residents at 71, and Italians at age 75 have the same level of age-related health problems as an average 65-year-old globally.

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Nothing Is Taboo!

Product: ENGAGE Multimedia Presentations

Author: Population Reference Bureau

Date: December 19, 2019

The ENGAGE presentation demonstrates how faith communities and young people in the Sahel can work together to advance the future of the region by promoting a frank and open dialogue, and first and foremost, encouraging social tolerance. It underscores how religious leaders can use their influence in positive ways to condemn the practices of child marriage and female genital mutilation. The presentation also reinforces the message that religious leaders from the region are ready to encourage family planning use among young married couples and support family life education programs in communities.

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Sahel ENGAGE

Sahel ENGAGE

Sahel ENGAGE (Arabic) Video thumbnail

Sahel ENGAGE (Arabic)

Sahel ENGAGE (Arabic)

The Sahel Faith ENGAGE initiative builds on the efforts of the PACE project to support policy dialogue about faith and family planning. Targeting three countries: Guinea, Mali, and Mauritania, the current activity brought together a task force composed of religious leaders (Muslim and Christian), youth, and government representatives to develop a multimedia presentation to promote dialogue about religion and young people’s reproductive health in the Sahel region.

Through this partnership and the presentation, PACE seeks to catalyze regional and national dialogue on the positive intersections of faith and young people’s reproductive health and development needs.

Snapshot in French Video thumbnail

Snapshot in French

Snapshot in French

The ENGAGE presentation was launched on Dec. 4, 2019 at the 8th Annual Meeting of the Ouagadougou Partnership, in Cotonou, Benin. In coming months, it will be disseminated nationally and subnationally in the three target countries.

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L'application du Protocole de Maputo peut réduire le nombre d’avortements dangereux

Produit: Fiche d'information

Rédigé par: Population Reference Bureau

Date: 10 décembre 2019

Le Protocole de Maputo, adopté en 2003, constitue l’un des premiers cadres juridiques pour la protection des droits et des libertés des femmes et des jeunes filles en Afrique.

Malgré des progrès, sa mise en œuvre reste difficile, puisque neuf femmes africaines sur dix en âge de procréer vivent dans des pays dotés de lois restrictives concernant l’avortement.

Le PRB a développé cette fiche d’information en tant qu’outil permettant aux décideurs, aux experts médicaux et juridiques ainsi qu’aux défenseurs de communiquer sur les avantages du Protocole de Maputo, dans le cadre du mécanisme de réponse rapide SAFE ENGAGE. La fiche d’information se concentre sur l’article 14 du protocole, qui met en avant la santé et « les droits reproductifs des femmes en autorisant l’avortement médicamenteux en cas d’agression sexuelle, de viol, d’inceste et lorsque la poursuite de la grossesse compromet la santé mentale et physique de la mère ou du fœtus ». Cette fiche utilise des données et des éléments visuels pour expliquer comment ce protocole peut réduire le nombre d’avortements non médicalisés.

View in English

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Applying the Maputo Protocol Can Reduce Unsafe Abortions

Product: Fact Sheet

Author: Population Reference Bureau

Date: December 10, 2019

The Maputo Protocol—adopted in 2003—serves as one of Africa’s first comprehensive legal frameworks for the protection of the rights and freedoms of women and girls.

Despite progress, challenges remain in its implementation, as nine out of 10 African women of reproductive age live in countries with restrictive abortion laws.

PRB developed this factsheet as a tool for policymakers, medical and legal experts, and advocates to communicate about the benefits of the Protocol, as part of the SAFE ENGAGE Rapid Response mechanism. The factsheet focuses on Article 14 of the Maputo Protocol, which highlights the health and “reproductive rights of women by authorizing medical abortion in cases of sexual assault, rape, incest, and where the continued pregnancy endangers the mental and physical health of the mother or the life of the mother or the foetus.”  The factsheet uses compelling data and visuals to explain how the Maputo Protocol can reduce unsafe abortion.

En Français

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Within Reach: Expanding Access to Safe Abortion

Product: ENGAGE Multimedia Presentation

Author: Population Reference Bureau

Date: November 22, 2019

Within Reach: Expanding Access to Safe Abortion is a multimedia advocacy tool to frame policy discussion around safe abortion, particularly in Africa.

Produced by Population Reference Bureau under the SAFE ENGAGE project, the presentation uses the latest data and evidence to illustrate how policy changes can decrease maternal mortality by improving equitable access to safe abortion services. Advocates can use this new resource to make the case for safe abortion with policy audiences and influencers around the world.

The presentation, authored by Lori Ashford, consultant, and Marissa Pine Yeakey, program director, was developed with guidance from a global Technical Advisory Group of researchers, advocates, and medical professionals.

Within Reach: Expanding Access to Safe Abortion Video thumbnail

Within Reach: Expanding Access to Safe Abortion

Within Reach: Expanding Access to Safe Abortion

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Objectifs à notre portée Vidéo SAFE Global Engage

Objectifs à notre portée Vidéo SAFE Global Engage

En Français

Access segments of Within Reach through these Snapshot Videos

Within Reach: Unsafe Abortion Endangers Women's Lives Video thumbnail

Within Reach: Unsafe Abortion Endangers Women's Lives

Within Reach: Unsafe Abortion Endangers Women's Lives

Within Reach: Abortion Legality and Frequency Video thumbnail

Within Reach: Abortion Legality and Frequency

Within Reach: Abortion Legality and Frequency

Within reach: Policy Changes for Safer Abortions Video thumbnail

Within reach: Policy Changes for Safer Abortions

Within reach: Policy Changes for Safer Abortions

Within Reach: The Financial Burdens of Unsafe Abortion Video thumbnail

Within Reach: The Financial Burdens of Unsafe Abortion

Within Reach: The Financial Burdens of Unsafe Abortion