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KidsData

KidsData promotes the health and well being of children in California by providing an easy-to-use resource that offers high quality, wide ranging, local data to those who work on behalf of children.

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health

The Challenge

Advocates and community members need evidence-based resources to support their efforts to advance children’s well-being in California.

The KidsData project makes data on the health and well-being of California’s children accessible to policymakers, service providers, grant seekers, media, parents, and others who influence children’s lives. The project provides context that distills key research and works with the user community to empower advocates and community members by providing them with resources they can use.

Our Approach

We collect current and historical data for nearly 60 topics of child well-being from more than 35 sources. Topic strengths include adverse childhood experiences; child poverty; and physical, emotional, and behavioral health. We also extensively cover child safety, childcare, education, demographic projections, homelessness, safety net programs, and more. We draw on data sources that include the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, California state agencies’ data files, and health surveys such as the National Survey of Children’s Health, California Healthy Kids Survey, and California Health Interview Survey. Data are provided for California’s counties, cities, school districts, and state legislative districts.

We have also developed innovative estimation methods to improve access to data on child health topics for some demographic subgroups and in small geographic regions. The KidsData program raises awareness about important data findings and demographic and geographic disparities in child health and well-being through newsletters, social media, and presentations. Through a network of collaborations with other organizations, we provide substantive and technical expertise to support beneficial outcomes in shared interest areas of children’s well-being. Data are available at www.KidsData.org.

KidsData.org is a source that I use on a regular basis for factual, non-partisan data.

– Debbie Look, California Assembly member

Impacts & Outcomes

PRB, the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health (LPFCH), and The Children’s Partnership partnered on an analysis of the implications for child health of changes to the Public Charge Rule. Through this analysis we found that nearly 180,000 noncitizen children in California would be at direct risk of losing their health insurance coverage—mostly Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)—under the revised rule. An additional 1.6 million citizen children of noncitizen parents in California could also be at risk. Learn more.

PRB analyzed trends in public health insurance (such as Medicaid and CHIP) among children in California. Through this analysis, we discovered that in 2015 and 2016, seven in 10 children in California participated in Medicaid or CHIP, either temporarily or year-round. Using these data, LPFCH wrote an advisory that sparked discussion of children’s health insurance among state legislators. Learn more.

KidsData.org “humanizes the numbers,” making it easier to digest the information and to utilize it in infographics, grant applications, and research briefs.

Mayra Alvarez, President of The Children’s Partnership

KidsData helps us see ways we can improve health and academic success for California's kids.

Lisa Eisenberg, M.P.P./M.S.W., senior policy analyst at the California School-Based Health Alliance

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U.S. Policy Communications Training

Translating scientific research findings for non-scientific audiences, the U.S. Policy Communications Training Program builds on PRB’s 40-year legacy of training researchers to bridge the gap between research findings and the policy development process.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

The Opportunity

While research often has profound practical implications, it must be communicated effectively to a variety of non-technical audiences to influence policy and programmatic change.

Current U.S. predoctoral graduate education is not designed to train researchers in how to communicate research results to nonacademic audiences. PRB addresses this gap with its U.S. Policy Communications Training Program.

The program prepares current Ph.D. students from U.S. academic institutions to influence policy and practice through effective communication. Participants learn to present findings on population and health topics in ways that are understandable and accessible to policy audiences, including decisionmakers, advocates, and the media. They will understand how research informs the policy environment, learn ways to communicate findings to U.S. and international policy audiences, and improve their ability to communicate in written and verbal formats.

The program’s main goal is to expand the cadre of U.S. population research professionals committed to policy communication. Its objectives are to: (1) address barriers that researchers face in communicating population-related research results to policy audiences; (2) engage a diverse group of predoctoral students (future population professionals) in policy communication over their careers; and (3) teach population scientists about the process by which research informs the policy environment, how to identify and communicate the policy implications of their research, and various tools/skills for communicating findings to U.S. policy audiences.

Our Approach

The U.S. Policy Communications Training Program consists of two components.

  1. Workshop: A week-long summer workshop in Washington, D.C., focuses on the role of research in the U.S. policymaking process and on techniques for effective communication of research findings to U.S. decisionmakers, media, and non-technical audiences. Participants hear firsthand from congressional researchers, lobbyists, and others about their experiences using research to effect change. They also practice distilling policy-relevant messages from their research and communicating this information in nontechnical language.
  2. Practicum: During the academic year following the workshop, participants receive mentorship and apply lessons learned to create two policy communication products, such as a policy brief, blog post, web article, or op-ed, based on their dissertations or related research topics.

The Impact

PRB has trained nearly 100 Ph.D. students enrolled in reputable U.S. academic institutions and conducting research on population and health topics to communicate with U.S. policy audiences, including government decisionmakers, advocates, and the media, since 2015.

Make an Application

The 2020 training program awards were announced in April 2020. The announcement for the 2021 training program was made on the PRB website in January 2021.

Applicants submitted the following to PRB:

  • A completed application form.
  • An up-to-date resume with a full list of educational and other professional activities.
  • Two letters of reference sent directly from the person writing the reference.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

If you are still enrolled in your Ph.D. program, you are still eligible to apply to the Policy Fellows program. During the selection process, we tend to give preference to those students who will remain enrolled in their academic programs through at least the following spring/summer. Please be sure to note your anticipated graduation date as requested on the application form.

 

We are limited to accepting participants whose research focus is related to demography, reproductive health, or population health.

  • Demographic topics include population dynamics, distribution, growth, and decline; migration; fertility, nuptiality, and family demography; mortality and morbidity; or the causes and consequences of demographic change.
  • Reproductive health studies of interest are limited to behavioral and social science research.
  • Population health areas include human health, productivity, and development at the population level. The populations of concern may be U.S. or non-U.S. populations.

 

PRB’s funding for this program is made possible by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—National Institutes of Health (NIH), Eunice Kennedy Shriver Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). As such, we are only able to support students who are U.S. citizens or Green Card holders (permanent residents). PRB does offer a separate Policy Communications Training for international students under our PACE Project, funded through the USAID Office of Population and Reproductive Health. This training supports students who are from USAID family-planning priority countries.

Unfortunately, at this time only students who are enrolled in Ph.D., Dr.PH., or other doctoral programs are eligible for this fellowship.

The Policy Fellows program is designed for students who are currently pursuing a Ph.D. or other doctoral level degree. If you are not currently enrolled as a student in a Ph.D. or doctoral program, you are not eligible to participate.

PRB will arrange and pay for participant to travel to the workshop, which includes flights, hotel accommodations, and a travel stipend for additional expenses. During the workshop, participants will stay at a comfortable hotel very near PRB’s office in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

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Combatting Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors in Youth

PRB produced a global interactive database and a series of regional policy reports and data sheets that highlight the importance of taking action now to address noncommunicable disease (NCD) risk factors among youth.

AstraZeneca Young Health Programme

The Challenge

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic respiratory diseases have become the world’s leading causes of death, accounting for 70% of all deaths globally in 2015. Compared to high-income countries, NCDs in lower-income countries generally claim lives at younger ages, often at the peak of individuals’ economic productivity. NCDs pose a significant threat to the health and well-being of populations, economic growth, and sustainable development, especially in low- and middle-income countries, underscoring the importance of prioritizing their prevention.

Our Approach

The four main NCDs share four risk factors: tobacco use, harmful use of alcohol, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet. These risk factors are all modifiable behaviors typically initiated or established during adolescence or young adulthood, setting the stage for NCDs later in life. Preventing or reducing risk behaviors among youth today can minimize the future burden of the growing NCD epidemic. Under this project, PRB created products that underscore the opportunity that low- and middle-income countries have to curb rising NCD epidemics. PRB also conducted policy communication training for youth advocates working on this health issue, and journalist training to improve the quantity and quality of reporting on the matter.

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Strengthening Evidence-Based Policy to Expand Access to Safe Abortion (SAFE ENGAGE)

The SAFE ENGAGE project supports safe abortion access by providing decisionmakers with the latest data on abortion, strengthening the capacity of advocates to achieve policy goals, and working with journalists to improve evidence-based reporting.

The Challenge

Thousands of women in sub-Saharan Africa die each year from pregnancy-related causes. Unsafe abortions account for one in seven maternal deaths in Africa, and more than 1.5 million women are treated each year for complications from unsafe abortion. Young African women are especially affected: More than half of unsafe abortions in the region are among women under age 25. Reducing deaths from unsafe abortion requires a policy environment that supports women to equitably access comprehensive prevention and treatment services—contraception, safe abortion, and postabortion care.

Our Approach

The three-year SAFE ENGAGE project is implemented in countries across sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Lagos state in Nigeria, and Zimbabwe. SAFE ENGAGE also contains a rapid response mechanism through which other national and regional partners can request creative, data-driven communications materials to support specific advocacy objectives.

 

SAFE ENGAGE

  • Advances policy dialogue for safe abortion by creating compelling evidence-based multimedia presentations and other materials for policymakers, advocates, and journalists.
  • Builds country-level individual and institutional capacity to use evidence for policy advocacy to promote safe abortion and reduce unsafe abortion.
  • Works with journalists to increase the quality and quantity of evidence-based news coverage on safe abortion through in-country media training and journalists’ engagement.

Impact

SAFE ENGAGE established four country-level task forces that brought together demographers, economists, medical professionals, women’s health and rights proponents, policymakers from government ministries, and parliamentarians for discussions about abortion. These task forces created spaces for collaboration and information sharing that broadened dialogue to include new perspectives, created consensus around objectives and messages, and renewed a focus on evidence. Each task force produced and disseminated ENGAGE multimedia presentation packages. This process strengthened the capacity of task force members to use data and messaging effectively in their own presentations and materials, strengthened collaboration and consensus among safe abortion champions, and generated important policy conversations that are continuing today.

SAFE ENGAGE also supported an intensive media training effort to equip a cadre of journalists in each country to accurately report on the policies and laws surrounding abortion and the determinants, incidence, and consequences of unsafe abortion. Each country setting required its own context-specific focus, and this tailored approach has reaped the reward of high-quality reporting across diverse news outlets.

During the second phase of the project, SAFE ENGAGE built on the work of the task forces by conducting policy communication training and regional learning exchanges to strengthen Task Force members’ ability to communicate with policy audiences and foster collaboration across neighboring countries. The regional learning exchanges also allowed participants to learn from each other’s successes and brainstorm approaches to overcoming shared challenges. SAFE ENGAGE also produced a guide to policy dialogue for safe abortion, which synthesized learning from the first phase of the project.

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Indicators of Well-Being for California's Children

PRB works with the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health to support the Kidsdata project, which promotes the health and well-being of children in California by making information about their well-being easily accessible.

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health

The Challenge

Advocates and community members need evidence-based resources to support their efforts to advance children’s well-being in California.

The Kidsdata project makes data on the health and well-being of California’s children accessible to policymakers, service providers, grant seekers, media, parents, and others who influence children’s lives. The project provides context that distills key research and works with the user community to empower advocates and community members by providing them with resources they can use.

Our Approach

We collect current and historical data for more than 300 indicators of child well-being, from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, California state agencies, health surveys (such as the California Health Interview Survey and National Survey of Children’s Health), and other sources. PRB has also developed innovative estimation methods to improve data coverage on child health topics. Data are provided for California’s counties, school districts, state legislative districts, and cities. In addition to data and analytical support, PRB partners with the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health (LPFCH) on webinars, blog posts, technical assistance to journalists, and analytical support for oversampling work to improve the quality of data about child health in California.

View Data at Kidsdata.org

Impact

PRB, LPFCH, and The Children’s Partnership partnered on an analysis of the implications for child health of changes to the Public Charge Rule. Through this analysis we found that nearly 180,000 noncitizen children in California would be at direct risk of losing their health insurance coverage—mostly Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)—under the revised rule. An additional 1.6 million citizen children of noncitizen parents in California could also be at risk. Learn more.

LPFCH worked with PRB to analyze trends in public health insurance (such as Medicaid and CHIP) among children in California. Through this analysis, we discovered that in 2015 and 2016, seven in 10 children in California participated in Medicaid or CHIP, either temporarily or year-round. LPFCH wrote an advisory about the data, which sparked discussion of children’s health insurance among state legislators. Learn more.

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Empowering Evidence-Driven Advocacy

Empowering Evidence-Driven Advocacy (EEDA) is a four-and-a-half year project (2017-2021) implemented by PRB and the International Youth Alliance for Family Planning (IYAFP) and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

The Challenge

Young people’s ability to freely determine their reproductive lives greatly affects their livelihoods and that of their future families. EEDA offers young people the opportunity to lead family planning policy change efforts through policy research, evidence-based communication, and targeted advocacy strategies.

EEDA’s goals are to improve the implementation of existing family planning policies, especially those that support youth access to and use of contraception; and generate new funding and policy commitments for family planning in response to evidence-driven advocacy. It aims to achieve these goals by increasing youth advocates’ capacity to measure policy implementation and hold governments accountable for their commitments, and by increasing decisionmakers’ use of evidence.

 

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Youth Speak: Why Engagement Increases Impact

Outcomes

EEDA has pioneered partner-driven and youth-led approaches, backed with solid evidence, that have generated 19 new family planning (FP) funding or policy commitments and contributed to improved implementation of FP policies.

To date, the project has supported the development of more than 76 data-driven, customized advocacy materials that are being used by youth advocates and partner organizations to advance advocacy objectives in 11 countries across Africa and Asia. Through a unique research-to-action curriculum and sustained collaboration, EEDA has imparted policy advocacy, communications, or data collection skills to nearly 150 youth advocates and representatives from partner organizations.

Our Work

EEDA seeks to accomplish our goals of stronger family planning funding, policy commitment, and policy implementation through three activities: a Youth-led Policy Advocacy Partnership in Five Countries, the Family Planning Advocacy Resource Hub, and the Youth Family Planning Policy Scorecard.

Youth Advocacy Partnership in Five Countries

Together, PRB and IYAFP assessed the implementation of youth-friendly family planning services in five countries. Through key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and surveys at the national and subnational level in each country, the assessments identified strengths and gaps in the implementation of family planning services to youth ages 15 to 24. We then worked together to create tailored communications materials that make the case for specific advocacy objectives tied to the findings and trained youth advocates on policy communication skills to integrate evidence generated by the assessments into their advocacy.

Access communications materials that make the case for specific advocacy objectives tied to our research findings in five countries:

Burkina FasoKenya Ethiopia  |  Nigeria  |  Uganda

Family Planning Advocacy Resource Hub

The Family Planning Advocacy Resource Hub, a component of the EEDA project, equips advocacy organizations with communications materials that fluently integrate data and evidence in formats that are compelling to decisionmakers. When paired with effective advocacy strategies, our evidence-based communication messages and tools can catalyze the progress of family planning advocacy organizations toward their objectives and goals.

Youth Family Planning Policy Scorecard

PRB monitors the policy environment for youth-friendly family planning services through our flagship Youth Family Planning Policy Scorecard, updated every six to 12 months. The Scorecard, available on a digital platform in English and French, analyzes the policy environment of 28 countries across eight indicators proven to increase youth access to and use of contraception.

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The Evidence Project

The Evidence Project uses implementation science—the strategic generation, translation, and use of evidence—to improve family planning policies, programs, and practices. Led by the Population Council, the five-year project (2013–2018)investigated which strategies work best in improving, expanding, and sustaining family planning services.

Population Council

The Evidence Project uses implementation science—the strategic generation, translation, and use of evidence—to improve family planning policies, programs, and practices. Led by the Population Council, the five-year project (2013–2018) is investigating which strategies work best in improving, expanding, and sustaining family planning services. It is also evaluating how to implement and scale up those strategies. Critical to the Evidence Project is translating this knowledge and working with stakeholders to apply the evidence and to build capacity in using implementation science to improve policies, programs, and practices.

Chart showing conceptual framework for implementation priorities for FP/RH

Chart showing conceptual framework for implementation priorities for FP/RH

Through implementation science, the Evidence Project pinpoints how family planning and reproductive health services can operate more effectively, equitably, and at scale. The project is focused on several implementation science technical priorities and activities organized around key supply and demand factors that affect access to and use of family planning and reproductive health services. It also focuses on three cross-cutting principles: rights and accountability, gender equality, and implementation science for scale up. Through this work, the Evidence Project is helping to reduce unmet need and unintended pregnancies around the world.

Project Activities

The Evidence Project is leading the discussion on:

Explore Project Publications

Access the latest Evidence Project publications on the Population Council website.

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Middle East and North Africa Program (MENA)

Middle East and North Africa (MENA) program, initiated in 2001 with funding from the Ford Foundation, responds to the region's need for timely and objective information on population, socioeconomic, and reproductive health issues. The project explores the linkages among these issues and provides evidence-based policy and program recommendations for decisionmakers in the region.

Ford Foundation

UNFPA Arab States Regional Office (ASRO)

MacArthur Foundation

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PRB’s Middle East and North Africa (MENA) program, initiated in 2001 with funding from the Ford Foundation, responds to the region’s need for timely and objective information on population, socioeconomic, and reproductive health issues.

PRB’s Middle East and North Africa (MENA) program, initiated in 2001 with funding from the Ford Foundation, responds to the region’s need for timely and objective information on population, socioeconomic, and reproductive health issues. The project explores the linkages among these issues and provides evidence-based policy and program recommendations for decisionmakers in the region. Working closely with research organizations in the region, the project team produces a series of policy briefs (in English and Arabic) on current population and reproductive health topics, conducts workshops on policy communication, and makes presentations at regional and international conferences.

In 2012, PRB collaborated with UNFPA Arab States Regional Office (ASRO) to produce policy briefs and hold policy communication workshops in the region.

In 2009, the MacArthur Foundation provided support to translate several of PRB’s flagship publications into Arabic.

 

MENA Publications and Online Discussions

(in chronological order, most recent first)

Adolescent Girls in Egypt (April 2016)
(English PDF: 372KB) (Arabic PDF: 264KB)

Video: Ending Child Marriage in Egypt (March 2016)
(English) (Arabic)

Data Sheet on Women’s Reproductive Health in Egypt (June 2015)
(English and Arabic PDF:1.5MB )

Advancing Egyptian Society by Ending Violence Against Women (June 2015)
(English PDF: 334KB) (Arabic PDF: 640KB)

Responding to Rapid Population Growth in Egypt (November 2014)
(English PDF: 518KB) (Arabic PDF: 982KB)

HIV and AIDS in the Middle East and North Africa (June 2014)
(English PDF: 483KB) (Arabic PDF: 906KB)

HIV in the Middle East: Low Prevalence but Not Low Risk (November 2013)
(English PDF: 483KB) (Arabic PDF: 522KB)

Ending Child Marriage in the Arab Region (June 2013)
(English PDF: 1.2MB) (Arabic PDF: 1.2MB)

The Need for Reproductive Health Education in Schools in Egypt (October 2012)
(English PDF: 1.8MB) (Arabic PDF: 390KB)

Women’s Need for Family Planning in Arab Countries (July 2012)
(English PDF: 888KB) (Arabic PDF: 741KB)

Egypt Youth Data Sheet: Selected Data From SYPE 2009 (February 2012)
(English PDF: 380KB) (Arabic PDF: 398KB)

Facts of Life: Youth Sexuality and Reproductive Health in the Middle East and North Africa (June 2011)
(English PDF: 1.2MB) (Arabic PDF: 2MB)

Spousal Violence in Egypt (September 2010)
(English PDF: 1.1MB) (Arabic PDF: 1.6MB)

Unintended Pregnancies in the Middle East and North Africa (July 2010)
(English PDF: 1.23MB) (Arabic PDF: 542KB)

Abortion in the Middle East and North Africa (September 2008)
(English PDF: 998KB)  (Arabic PDF: 1.48MB)

Advancing Research to Inform Reproductive Health Policies in the Middle East and North Africa  (September 2008)
(English PDF: 140KB)  (Arabic PDF: 1.5MB)

PRB Discuss Online: “The Middle East Youth Bulge,” with Ragui Assaad, regional director for West Asia and North Africa, Population Council  (May 2008)

Sexual and Reproductive Health in the Middle East and North Africa: A Guide for Reporters  (May 2008)
(English PDF: 1.3MB) (Arabic PDF: 2MB)

Youth in the Middle East and North Africa: Demographic Opportunity or Challenge?  (April 2007)
(English PDF: 187KB) (Arabic PDF: 320KB)

Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health in the Middle East and North Africa  (April 2007)
(English PDF: 123KB) (Arabic PDF: 2.47MB)

Time to Intervene: Preventing the Spread of HIV/AIDS in the Middle East and North Africa  (January 2007)
(English PDF: 181KB) (Arabic PDF: 921KB)

Investing in Reproductive Health to Achieve Development Goals: The Middle East and North Africa  (December 2005)
(English PDF: 234KB) (Arabic PDF: 170KB)

Reforming Family Laws to Promote Progress in the Middle East and North Africa  (December 2005)
(English PDF: 171KB) (Arabic PDF: 180KB)

Marriage in the Arab World  (September 2005)
(English PDF: 226KB) (Arabic PDF: 451KB)

Islam and Family Planning  (August 2004)
(English PDF: 286KB) (Arabic PDF: 835KB) (French PDF: 156KB)

Progress Toward the Millennium Development Goals in the Middle East and North Africa  (March 2004)
(English PDF: 156KB) (Arabic PDF: 200KB)

Making Motherhood Safer in Egypt  (March 2004)
(English PDF: 821KB) (Arabic PDF: 732KB)

Empowering Women, Developing Society: Female Education in the Middle East and North Africa  (October 2003)
(English PDF: 144KB) (Arabic PDF: 649KB)

Women’s Reproductive Health in the Middle East and North Africa  (February 2003)
(English PDF: 234KB)

Finding the Balance: Water Scarcity and Population Demand in the Middle East and North Africa  (July 2002)
(English PDF: 789KB) (Arabic PDF: 1.1MB)

Iran’s Family Planning Program: Responding to a Nation’s Needs  (June 2002)
(English PDF: 456KB) (Arabic PDF: 1.08MB)

Population Trends and Challenges in the Middle East and North Africa  (October 2001)
(English PDF: 181KB)

MENA publications are available in English (and selected ones in Arabic and French) on PRB’s website. Print copies can be ordered free of charge by writing to communications@prb.org.

 

MENA Working Paper Series

In 2008, PRB invited researchers from the MENA region to participate in its summer policy communication workshop in Washington, D.C. Later, PRB and Assiut University, Egypt, held joint policy communication workshops in Assiut (December 2009) and in Hurghada (October 2011). The latest PRB workshop in Egypt, seventh in the series, was held at the Alexandria High Institute for Public Health in October 2014 (see table).

 

Policy Communication Training Workshops in Egypt

 

City/Year Collaborating Organization Workshop Topic
Assiut
December 2009
Assiut University’s Department of Public Health and Community Medicine Population and reproductive health
Hurghada
October 2011
Assiut University’s Department of Public Health and Community Medicine Youth sexual and reproductive health
Cairo
March 2012
UNFPA Arab States Regional Office Maternal health
Cairo
September 2012
UNFPA Arab States Regional Office Family planning
Alexandria
October-November 2012
Alexandria Center for Women’s Health and Development Youth reproductive health
Cairo
January 2014
National Population Council Women’s reproductive health
Alexandria
October 2014
Alexandria High Institute for Public Health and Population Council HIV and AIDS

 

The workshops (conducted in English) helped researchers identify the policy implications of their research findings, understand how research can influence the policy process, and communicate findings. Participants explored research-to-policy gaps and learned about the policy process and barriers to effective use of research, and prepared policy-oriented presentations. These workshops were adapted from a successful training program developed by the Population Reference Bureau in 1996.

Selected participants attending the workshops summarized the results of their research findings as part of PRB’s MENA Working Paper Series:

Most Clients Satisfied With Egypt’s Youth-Friendly Clinics, by Fatma El Zahraa Geel
(English PDF: 615KB) (Arabic PDF: 722KB)

Cairo University Study Shows Mental Ill-Health During Pregnancy Is Associated With Spousal Violence, by Rehab Abdelhai and Hanan Mosleh
(English PDF:669KB) (Arabic PDF: 742KB)

School-Based Reproductive Health Education Among Adolescent Girls in Alexandria, Egypt, by May M. Tawfik, Omneya G. El-Sharkawy, Mohamed A. Abdelbaqy, Sara A. Hanafy, Shehata F. Shehata, Adel Malek, Ibrahim Kharboush, and Hanaa M. Ismail
(English PDF:1.4 MB) (Arabic PDF: 1MB)

Mother-Daughter Communication About Sexual and Reproductive Health in Rural Areas of Alexandria, Egypt, by Yasmine Y. Muhammad and Heba M. Mamdouh
(English PDF: 607KB) (Arabic PDF: 982KB

Quality Sexual Education Needed for Adolescents in Egyptian Schools, by Fatma El Zahraa Geel
(English PDF: 617KB) (Arabic PDF: 677KB)

Minding the Gap in Alexandria: Talking to Girls in Schools About Reproductive Health, by Sara A. Hanafy
(English PDF: 871KB) (Arabic PDF: 487KB)

“Are Imams in Egypt Prepared to Help Stop the Spread of HIV/AIDS?” by Omaima El-Gibaly and Khaled Hemeyda
(Arabic PDF: 217KB)

“Domestic Violence High in Egypt, Affecting Women’s Reproductive Health,” by Eman M. Monazea and Ekram M. Abdel Khalek
(Arabic PDF: 200KB)

Unintended Pregnancies Remain High in Jordan, by Rozzet Jurdi-Salah, University of Western Ontario
(English PDF: 126KB) (Arabic PDF: 357KB)

Marriage Patterns in Palestine, by Yara Jarallah, Birzeit University
(English PDF: 139KB) (Arabic PDF: 307KB)

10 Years After Introducing Mobile Clinics in Assiut Governorate, by Ghada Salah El-Deen T. Al-Attar, Assiut University
(English PDF: 114KB) (Arabic PDF: 1.75MB)

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Bridging High Impact Family Planning Communications and Advocacy

Investment in effective policy and program interventions for youth family planning (FP) improves the use of data and evidence for FP advocacy.

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

PRB is implementing a project, Bridging High Impact Family Planning Communications and Advocacy, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The goals of this project, which began in May 2016, are to facilitate investment in effective policy and program interventions for youth family planning (FP) and to improve the use of data and evidence for FP advocacy.

The project has two components:

  1.  Develop an index assessing countries’ commitments to policy and program interventions that increase youth access to and use of contraception.
  2. Establish a Resource Hub to provide advocacy partners with analyses, communication materials, data, and advocacy capacity to achieve their objectives.

 

Youth FP Policy Scorecard

PRB’s Youth Family Planning Policy, released in April 2017, measures the favorability of national policy and program environments for youth uptake of contraception. It reviews countries’ commitments across six indicators that have been proven to affect access to and use of contraception among youth ages 15 to 24. The current version of the scorecard includes data for sixteen countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sindh (Pakistan), Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda.

The goal of the scorecard is to increase understanding about what makes a policy environment favorable to youth and adolescent uptake of contraception and what barriers young people face to accessing services, thus providing governments, donors, and civil society with greater knowledge of where to invest their resources.

PRB’s “Youth Contraceptive Use: Effective Interventions, Reference Guide” compiles existing evidence of policy and program interventions that have proven to be effective in increasing access to and use of contraception among youth, as well as those that are promising but have inconclusive evidence and those shown to be ineffective.

Investing in the Future: Youth and Family Planning

Investing in the Future: Youth and Family Planning in Tanzania Video thumbnail

Investing in the Future: Youth and Family Planning in Tanzania

Family Planning Advocacy Resource Hub

The Resource Hub provides support to FP advocacy partners to develop evidence-based advocacy materials and strategies. PRB is developing customized products that enhance advocates’ abilities to analyze, interpret, and communicate data and evidence to educate local decisionmakers of the benefits of FP. The Resource Hub currently supports two advocacy initiatives.

PRB collaborated with the Advance Family Planning team in Tanzania to develop a package of materials highlighting new survey results on adolescent pregnancy and youth FP. The three regional infographics, short multimedia video, policy brief, and media guide connect investments in youth to broader national development and outline actions that policymakers can take to meet young people’s FP needs. These materials will support partners’ ongoing advocacy at national and subnational levels.

Family Planning: A Strong Investment for India

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Family Planning: A Strong Investment for India

In India, PRB collaborated with AFP and Pathfinder International to develop a multimedia video outlining how family planning shapes women’s empowerment and community well-being. The video can be used as a tool for corporate social responsibility (CSR) managers to advocate for corporate boards to allocate funds towards FP programs in nearby communities. An accompanying fact sheet further details how investing in family planning can spur India’s economy, catalyze the workforce, and improve health outcomes of women and children in India.

In West Africa, PRB has partnered with the Ouagadougou Partnership (OP) Coordination Unit and its Youth Ambassadors (YAs), who are enthusiastic and dynamic champions for youth access to FP. PRB and the YAs held a cocreation workshop to plan two compelling advocacy tools for the YAs to launch at the 2016 OP Annual Meeting and later customize and adapt in individual countries. A short introductory video outlines youth FP needs in the region and the need for urgent attention. A multimedia presentation highlights barriers in youth access to contraception, the tangible benefits of overcoming those barriers, and youth-focused recommendations for action.